Shared Advice for New Demonstrators

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Shared Advice for New Demonstrators

Charlotte Lindmeier
Hello everyone,
A big thank you to all who shared this week.If you notice there are a few themes in the advice shared this week.  Keep these ideas in mind as you start your new business. Our winner of the FREE WEEK of SUDSOL is Cathy Hansen.

Our question this week is:
If you could change one thing in the way you run your business what would it be? We're not looking for "Covid would not exist" etc. we're looking for business practices. Please share.  It might help a new demonstrator to avoid our mistakes.
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I would increase my online presence by updating my DBWS and starting my own blog.
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I would have been more liberal with the stamp sets, etc. that I sold at the end of a catalog. I wouldn't have sold everything, but my retired stuff is outrunning my current stuff.
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I would consistently sell my retired product.  No more “I’m going to save this, I might use it someday”.
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I would start by being honest about why I am, and continue to be, a demo. The motivation to sign up may not be the motivation as to why one continues, but the approach and plan going forward may not have shifted commensurately.
Also, sometimes making a small change to meet current needs can really kickstart things; but I really believe change should be what you want, not merely what everyone else is doing.
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I would be more selective about what I buy from the catty’s as soon as they come out. Only to find that I never use them.
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I would be much more consistent with social media and blog posts
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I would be disciplined about not buying more product than I can demonstrate.
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I would have started a blog and Facebook group much sooner.  I would try not to buy more than I can demonstrate at my classes but that is a challenge for me.  I would try harder to recruit. I guess that is 3 things not just one.
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In the beginning, I would have put more emphasis into online venues like a blog, Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest among others.  Many of my downline have come to me through those efforts especially Pinterest where I now have a large following.  Recruiting is the key to success and Pinterest has really boosted my recruits.  Also, selling online can be done all through the day (and night) but in-person workshops, clubs, and events are necessary, but very time sensitive.  Meaning you (and whatever location you use) must be available and prepared on date certain.  Online events can be ongoing….and you can do them in your pj's if you are mailing our kits, classes, techniques.
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If I could change one thing about my business (or actually, about me), I would be more cognizant of my limitations.  It’s far too easy for me to say “yes” to every card making opportunity that comes along, so I sometimes find myself overwhelmed.
 
Currently, I’m doing two “card kits to go” events a month – one typically requires about 40 combined card kits and pre-made cards (for customers and the other participating demos); the other is typically closer to 60.  I’m also teaching a weekly Zoom class for a local women’s group which features 3 card designs.  Currently, the class is averaging 8 or 9 participants, and the card kits need to be assembled for pick up in advance of the classes.  More recently, I’ve started trying to fit in a monthly Zoom class for my customers, and they are clamoring for more.  (Each of these events require unique card designs because I have a few groupies . . . er . . . stampers who participate in all of them.)
 
Additionally, I maintain a blog and two Facebook Groups in association with my business, all of which are always running behind schedule because I just can’t seem to find the time to sit at my computer and update them with all of the card instructions.  To remedy this, once I’m caught up (fingers crossed – maybe this week), I plan to try recording assembly instructions rather than typing them out, and then posting the videos on YouTube.  All I would need to post then would be the ingredients and measurements and a link to the video.
 
Ok . . . in truth, I LOVE what I’m doing – I love creating the designs (and occasionally CASEing or tweaking other people’s card ideas) and assembling the kits.  Unfortunately, since I haven’t yet figured out how to manufacture additional time, it occasionally borders on becoming work rather than play.
Charlotte Lindmeier
Question of the Week